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The Very Hot Weather on 19 July 2005
(19 July 2005)

Under the influence of the subsiding air associated with Typhoon Haitang, it was fine and very hot over southern China today. Temperatures over inland areas generally rose above 38 degrees. Locally, temperatures rose above 35 degrees over most parts of the territory. This is the result of the influence of the continental hot air brought about by the northwesterly airstream. The maximum temperature recorded at the Observatory this afternoon was 35.4 degrees, the highest so far this summer and the second highest temperature in July recorded since 1885 (see the table below).

Rank
Maximum temperatures
(degrees)
Date
1
35.7
1968.07.25
2
35.4
2005.07.19
3
35.0
1980.07.10
4
34.9
1958.07.16
5
34.8
1982.07.29
6
34.8
1986.07.10
7
34.7
1972.07.2

A map showing the maximum temperatures over various parts of Hong Kong today is given in figure 1 below.


Figure 1 Maximum temperature recorded on 19 July 2005 (up to 6pm)


The weather is expected to remain very hot tomorrow (20 July 2005). The maximum temperature in the urban areas will be about 33 degrees and a couple of degrees higher in the New Territories. The public is advised to take appropriate precautions against heatstroke.

For updates on the latest weather report, information on the Very Hot Weather Warning and UV Index, members of the public may browse the Observatory Internet web pages at:

http://www.weather.gov.hk/wxinfo/currwx/current.htm(update weather report);

http://www.weather.gov.hk/wservice/warning/coldhot.htm(Very Hot Weather Warning); and

http://www.weather.gov.hk/wxinfo/uvindex/english/euvtoday.htm(UV Index)

Members of the public who wish to get more information on the prevention of heat stroke can call DH's Central Health Education Unit Hotline at 2833 0111. Information can also be obtained from DH's health educational homepage at http://www.cheu.gov.hk and click "What's New" to obtain a relevant fact sheet.





Last revision date: <20 Dec 2012>