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Public get chance to learn basics of weather forecasting
( 27 October 2003)

The Hong Kong Observatory will hold a training course for the public in November on interpreting weather charts and weather forecasting.

The course will be held on the Saturday mornings of November 15, 22 and 29. Details are available at:

www.weather.gov.hk/education/coursec_0311.htm

The public can also enrol on the website.

Weather is highly changeable, and it affects people from every walk of life. Because of this, there are a large number of weather enthusiasts in Hong Kong. The observatory has in recent years made available on its webpage real-time weather information such as weather charts, radar and satellite imagery. The public can scan information on the weather from the comfort of their homes or offices and make simple weather forecasts on their own. However, the observatory has received many enquiries about training courses on interpretation of weather information and weather forecasting.

Mr Chan Chik Cheung, Senior Scientific Officer of the Hong Kong Observatory in charge of the November training course, said the weather information available on the observatory website enabled people to make weather-related decisions to suit their own circumstances. "For example, they can decide whether to proceed with or suspend weather-sensitive activities based on the intensity, distribution and forecasting of rain appearing on weather charts and radar pictures."

However, he pointed out that the interpretation of weather information and weather forecasting was not straightforward, because of the highly changeable nature of weather. He urged those seeking to understand the basics of weather forecasting to sign up for the course.

"The course is also suitable for teachers to increase their understanding of weather systems that will affect Hong Kong. It should be helpful to them in teaching related topics," Mr Chan said.


Last revision date: <20 Dec 2012>